The Texas Tribune/University of Texas poll, which surveyed 1,200 registered Texas voters in February of this year (2015), found 47% in support of campus carry, 45% opposed to it, and 8% unsure about it.

The 72% statistic cited in the Everytown commercial is taken from a poll the gun-control organization conducted itself. According to  The Dallas Morning News, the Everytown poll—which surveyed 828 "likely" Texas voters in March of this year—included questions "clearly designed to push [respondents] in a certain direction."


The Everytown poll made no mention of licensing requirements or age limits and simply asked whether students should be allowed to carry concealed handguns in various locations on campus. There is a big difference between allowing all 52,000 students at the University of Texas at Austin to carry concealed handguns on campus and allowing campus carry by Texas concealed handgun license (CHL) holders, including the fewer than 500 UT-Austin students who—based on estimates drawn from Texas Department of Public Safety statistics—possess a Texas CHL.


If Everytown and Moms Demand Action believe there is some sort of flaw with the Texas Tribune/University of Texas poll conducted just one month prior to their own poll, why do they continue to cite the TT/UT poll's finding that 68% of Texans oppose open carry?

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation is opposed by 72% of Texans.

ACCURACY: False

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would allow guns in college classrooms.

ACCURACY: True

How well does this anti-campus carry TV commercial reflect the facts surrounding Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937, the campus carry legislation currently pending before the Texas Legislature?

(NOTE: This page has not been updated since the passage of SB 11; it reflects SB 11 as it was originally filed.)

Under Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937, universities would retain the right to regulate the storage of firearms in on-campus housing. This means university officials could require license holders living in dorms to store their firearms at the campus police station (currently allowed at many Texas universities) or in the license holder's car (currently allowed at all Texas colleges and universities, per state law). Although this provision of the proposed law would allow universities to regulate a licensed dorm resident's handgun only when the gun is not being carried by the license holder, this provision virtually eliminates the greatest risk associated with allowing guns in dorms—the risk of a gun being accessed by someone other than the license holder.

It doesn't take a math major to understand that guns in dorms would be a non-issue at most universities. According to Austin NBC news affiliate KXAN, only 2.5% of the students living on campus at The University of Texas at Austin (the second-largest university in Texas) are 21 or older. According to the UT-Austin website, the university has an on-campus housing capacity of 6,956. Calculating 2.5% of 6,956 reveals that there are approximately 174 on-campus residents who are 21 or older. The fact that 9.5% of UT-Austin students are foreign nationals means that only about 157 UT-Austin dorm residents are eligible for a Texas concealed handgun license (CHL). Using the rate (1.3%) at which Texans age 21-23 are licensed to carry a concealed handgun, it can be estimated that there are approximately two CHL holders living in on-campus housing at UT-Austin.

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would force guns into college dorm rooms.

ACCURACY: Misleading

College parties (particularly those in Texas) take place almost exclusively off-campus. The campus carry legislation pending before the Texas Legislature would not change the laws at bars, tailgating events, fraternity/sorority houses, or off-campuses residences—the locations where college life is likely to get "crazy," as the Everytown commercial puts it. The reality is that most college parties take place in locations where licensed concealed carry is already legal and that the type of "crazy" party shown in the Everytown commercial would never be allowed in any of the campus buildings (e.g., libraries and classrooms) affected by Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937.

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would allow guns at college parties.

ACCURACY: False

Under Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937, trained, licensed, carefully screened adults (age 21 and above) who are currently allowed to carry concealed handguns in locations such as movie theaters, shopping malls, churches, and even the Texas Capitol would be allowed to carry concealed handguns in college classrooms.

Under Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937, trained, licensed, carefully screened adults (age 21 and above) who already enjoy the right to carry concealed handguns in all other public libraries would enjoy that same right in college libraries.

Fact-Checking Our Opponents'

TV Commercial

An impartial poll conducted by the Texas Tribune and the University of Texas at Austin found more Texans in support of campus carry than opposed to it.

Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937 would not affect fraternity or sorority houses, which are not technically part of a college campus. A fraternity or sorority house is privately owned or leased property governed by the overseeing fraternal organization. Such organizations would remain free to determine their own firearms policies.

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would allow guns in college libraries.

ACCURACY:
 True

Texas Senate Bill 11/House Bill 937 would not repeal the current statutory prohibition against licensed concealed carry at collegiate sporting events.

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would allow guns at college football games.

ACCURACY: False

This April 21, 2015, Facebook post from Moms Demand Action cites the same poll that found more Texans in support of campus carry than opposed to it.

CLAIM: Campus carry legislation would force guns into fraternity houses.

ACCURACY: False